Archive for the 'Religion & Spirituality' Category

Found In Egyptian Sands…

One MILLION mummies? Who are they?

 

And…read closely and you will also find mention of the other recent discovery that is baffling scientists.

 

Why is this news so under reported? Is there a bit of a cover-up going on here?

 

Experts Make Massive Discovery Under the Sand of the Egyptian Desert — and It’s Left Them Puzzled

by Oliver Darcy

 

“A team of archeologists say they have unearthed an ancient cemetery in the Egyptian desert containing more than one million mummies buried approximately 1,500 years ago.

 

“We are fairly certain we have over a million burials within this cemetery. It’s large, and it’s dense,” project director Kerry Muhlestein said while presenting his findings in Toronto last month, according to Live Science.

 

The discovery, however, has left the experts from Utah’s Brigham Young University a bit baffled…”

 

For the rest, click here.

 

 

 

 

 

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The Origin of Witches

The long, elaborate history of our besties, the witches…

 

Where do witches come from?

 

by Alastair Sooke (BBC Culture)

 

 

“Images of alluring young witches and hideous hags have been around for centuries – but what do they mean?

 

Ask any Western child to draw a witch, and the chances are that he or she will come up with something familiar: most likely a hook-nosed hag wearing a pointy hat, riding a broomstick or stirring a cauldron. But where did this image come from? The answer is more arresting and complex than you might think, as I discovered last week when I visited Witches and Wicked Bodies, a new exhibition at the British Museum in London that explores the iconography of witchcraft.

 

Witches have a long and elaborate history. Their forerunners appear in the Bible, in the story of King Saul consulting the so-called Witch of Endor. They also crop up in the classical era in the form of winged harpies and screech-owl-like “strixes” – frightening flying creatures that fed on the flesh of babies.

 

Circe, the enchantress from Greek mythology, was a sort of witch, able to transform her enemies into swine. So was her niece Medea. The ancient world, then, was responsible for establishing a number of tropes that later centuries would come to associate with witches…”

 

For the rest, click here.

 

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Smoke and Mirrors of an Ancient Empire

An unsolved ancient mystery, a concealed entrance to the underworld, and an entranced “sibyl” with the power to influence an empire — these are the elements of an unforgettable  history lesson…

 

The Unsolved Mystery of the Tunnels at Baiae

 

Did ancient priests fool visitors to a sulfurous subterranean stream that they had crossed the River Styx and entered Hades?

 

By Mike Dash (smithsonian.com)

 

SibylCumae-by-Andrea-del-Catagno-Uffizi-gallery-226x500

 

“There is nothing remotely Elysian about the Phlegræan Fields, which lie on the north shore of the Bay of Naples; nothing sylvan, nothing green. The Fields are part of the caldera of a volcano that is the twin of Mount Vesuvius, a few miles to the east, the destroyer of Pompeii. The volcano is still active–it last erupted in 1538, and once possessed a crater that measured eight miles across–but most of it is underwater now. The portion that is still accessible on land consists of a barren, rubble-strewn plateau. Fire bursts from the rocks in places, and clouds of sulfurous gas snake out of vents leading up from deep underground.

 

The Fields, in short, are hellish, and it is no surprise that in Greek and Roman myth they were associated with all manner of strange tales. Most interesting, perhaps, is the legend of the Cumæan sibyl, who took her name from the nearby town of Cumæ, a Greek colony dating to about 500 B.C.– a time when the Etruscans still held sway much of central Italy and Rome was nothing but a city-state ruled over by a line of tyrannical kings.

 

The sibyl, so the story goes, was a woman named Amalthaea who lurked in a cave on the Phlegræan Fields. She had once been young and beautiful–beautiful enough to attract the attentions of the sun god, Apollo, who offered her one wish in exchange for her virginity. Pointing to a heap of dust, Amalthaea asked for a year of life for each particle in the pile, but (as is usually the way in such old tales) failed to allow for the vindictiveness of the gods. Ovid, in Metamorphoses, has her lament that “like a fool, I did not ask that all those years should come with ageless youth, as well.” Instead, she aged but could not die. Virgil depicts her scribbling the future on oak leaves that lay scattered about the entrance to her cave, and states that the cave itself concealed an entrance to the underworld…”

 

Read more here.

 

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