Archive for the 'Mythology' Category

The Invisible Paintings of Angkor Wat

Hidden temple magic…

 

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“The temple of Angkor Wat in Cambodia is one of the most famous monuments in the world and is noted for its spectacular bas-relief friezes depicting ceremonial and religious scenes. Recent work reported here has identified an entirely new series of images consisting of paintings of boats, animals, deities and buildings. Difficult to see with the naked eye, these can be enhanced by digital photography and decorrelation stretch analysis, a technique recently used with great success in rock art studies. The paintings found at Angkor Wat seem to belong to a specific phase of the temple’s history in the sixteenth century AD when it was converted from a Vishnavaite Hindu use to Theravada Buddhist….”

 

For the complete article please click here to go to Antiquity Review.

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Stone Age “skull-smashing” culture: Fear of zombies?

Evidence of a fear of zombies in the ancient world? Perhaps the zombie craze comes from somewhere very old inside our brains, a primal fear…

 

The zombie apocalypse may be much more than a plot device exploited by modern horror movies. In fact, fears about the walking dead may go back all the way to the Stone Age.

The zombie apocalypse may be much more than a plot device exploited by modern horror movies. In fact, fears about the walking dead may go back all the way to the Stone Age.

 

 

Stone Age people may have battled against a zombie apocalypse

 

Discovery of skulls with their faces smashed in posthumously suggests Neolithic people believed the dead posed a threat to the living.

 

By: Bryan Nelson

 

 

“Archaeologists working in Europe and the Middle East have recently unearthed evidence of a mysterious Stone Age “skull-smashing” culture, according to New Scientist. Human skulls buried underneath an ancient settlement in Syria were found detached from their bodies with their faces smashed in. Eerily, it appears that the skulls were exhumed and detached from their bodies several years after originally being buried. It was then that they were smashed in and reburied separate from their bodies.

 

According to Juan José Ibañez of the Spanish National Research Council in Barcelona, the finding could suggest that these Stone Age “skull-smashers” believed the living were under some kind of threat from the dead. Perhaps they believed that the only way of protecting themselves was to smash in the corpses’ faces, detach their heads and rebury them apart from their bodies.

 

But here’s the creepy thing: many of the 10,000-year-old skulls appear to have been separated from their spines long after their bodies had already begun to decompose. Why would this skull-smashing ritual be performed so long after individuals had died? Did they only pose a threat to the living long after their original burial and death?…”

 

For the complete article click here.

 

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England’s biggest peacetime witch trial: The Trial of The Lancashire Witches

It was England’s biggest peacetime witch trial: The Trial of The Lancashire Witches. And it was brutal…

 

Does it have relevance today?

 

Illustration from James Crossley’s introduction to Pott’s Discovery of witches in the County of Lancaster (1845) reprinted from the original edition of 1613. - See more at: http://publicdomainreview.org/2012/08/22/the-lancashire-witches-1612-2012/#sthash.zZSj2BFu.dpuf

Illustration from James Crossley’s introduction to Pott’s Discovery of witches in the County of Lancaster (1845) reprinted from the original edition of 1613.

 

The Lancashire Witches 1612-2012 (The Public Domain Review)

 

Not long after ten Lancashire residents were found guilty of witchcraft and hung in August 1612, the official proceedings of the trial were published by the clerk of the court Thomas Potts in his The Wonderfull Discoverie of Witches in the Countie of Lancaster. Four hundred years on, Robert Poole reflects on England’s biggest witch trial and how it still has relevance today.

 

 

Four hundred years ago, in 1612, the north-west of England was the scene of England’s biggest peacetime witch trial: the trial of the Lancashire witches. Twenty people, mostly from the Pendle area of Lancashire, were imprisoned in the castle as witches. Ten were hanged, one died in gaol, one was sentenced to stand in the pillory, and eight were acquitted. The 2012 anniversary sees a small flood of commemorative events, including works of fiction by Blake Morrison, Carol Ann Duffy and Jeanette Winterson. How did this witch trial come about, and what accounts for its enduring fame?

 

We know so much about the Lancashire Witches because the trial was recorded in unique detail by the clerk of the court, Thomas Potts, who published his account soon afterwards as The Wonderful Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster…

 

See the rest here.

 

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